How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

We regularly have volunteer roles to support us at events and with fundraising in the Cambridge area, and it would be great to have support of Cambridge RAG! In the past volunteer roles have included event support volunteer opportunities at the local Royston in Blue fun run in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust, at local fundraising events, as well as at a local Gran Fondo cycling event, again raising money for Teenage Cancer Trust. For RAG members wanting to experience the London marathon, we’d really like to engage students to come and volunteer with us at this iconic event and enjoy the London marathon buzz! We’re excited to work with RAG and would very much like to explore other ways we could engage RAG to support us to raise more money to help us to reach and support more young people diagnosed with cancer.

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

In 2011 I was approached by a friend asking if I would like to be part of a committee called “Royston in Blue” and help organise a charity fun run in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust. I attended a meeting with the charity and the proposed committee and immediately realised how important the charity was. Having a Teenage daughter myself it really struck a chord. After a year working with the committee in 2012 a job became available within Teenage Cancer Trust for the role of Local Fundraising Co-ordinator were I was successful. In 2014 the position of Regional Fundraiser – East Anglia became available which I applied for and was again successful. I have now been in the Fundraiser for nearly two years and with the Charity just over 4 years and still loving it.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

It is so important to research the charity so they can see you have done your homework, understand the charities mission and goals. Have examples of fundraising events they have been involved in. Be confident and passionate and believe in what you are doing. It is amazing if you believe in what you are talking about how it shows in your mannerisms and tone of voice. Perseverance is a strong key, some companies/schools can be hard to get into for fundraising it can takes years before they will even meet you……………. don’t give up!

What is the best bit about your job? –

I feel extremely privileged, I work with many different wonderful people who always blow me away by their generosity from charity balls to the little child who donated their tooth fairy money. I build the most wonderful relationships with people who are going through the most challenging time of their life and I am a part of that……….. I find my job extremely humbling. Fundraising is a fast pace job, never ending and exhausting, BUT also extremely rewarding, never boring, meet wonderful people – this is the most rewarding and satisfying job I have had.

How can local students start volunteering with your charity? –

It’s pretty easy to start volunteering with us. You simply go online at http:// foodcycle.org.uk/get-stuck-in/volunteer/ and after doing a short food safety quiz you can set up an account. Once that’s done you just look at the calendar to see what events we’ve got coming up, and add your name! We’ve always got plenty of opportunities – cooking, hosting, Saturday lunchtimes or Wednesday/Thursday evenings, as well as other catering and fundraising events. Not sure if FoodCycle’s for you? Come along to lunch or dinner, and experience it for yourself.

How did you enter the charity sector? –

Four years ago I was working in academia and after some major changes in my life, I decided I wanted a career change so I went looking for volunteering opportunities – and found FoodCycle. I’d always been interested in issues around poverty, social inclusion and community (I used to teach social policy) so their work on food poverty really appealed to me. The four years I’ve been volunteering with them have been a real eye opener and I’ve learned a lot about food waste too.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

Practical skills and hands-on experience, without a doubt. How can you make decisions about services, about people’s lives without having met them, worked with them and found out what it is they need?

What is the best bit about your job? –

The people, and the wonderful sense of community you get when people sit round the dinner table together. I’ve met some fantastic people over the last four years, volunteers and guests, whose paths I may never have crossed otherwise. They’ve taught me a lot, and I wouldn’t have missed it for the world.

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

We aren’t a very well-known charity, so we would love to see students help spread the word as local ambassadors. Tell your networks and contacts about us, and if you’re fancy it, you could also give a short talk about Farm Africa to a local group, club or organisation. We’ll provide you with a presentation so all you need to do is share your passion for Farm Africa!

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

Most fundraisers will tell you they ‘fell into fundraising’. They hadn’t planned to be a fundraiser when they were at university! – I originally studied to be an actress. At the same time I was working as a face-to-face fundraiser. I really enjoyed learning about a variety of charities and talking to people every day, inspiring them to want to give to a good cause. I then saw an advert for a voluntary internship at a small charity called The Haemophilia Society. I volunteered full time, for eight months and learnt a lot about all areas of fundraising. I found that my organisational and people skills lent myself to community and events fundraising, and that’s what my career has focussed on since. I was a particularly long-serving volunteer but it’s not a necessity to commit that much time. I would advise that entry-level roles can be quite competitive so the more experience you have, the more you can showcase why you would be the best person for a role.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

Passion and preparation. Passion – the charity sector can often mean working long hours and it can be a lot of hard work. Your dedication and passion for your role and the cause will take you a long way. One of my top tips would be to work for a cause you truly care about, and let your passion shine through. You can never prepare too much. Do your research – charities websites, the charity commission, news sites, social media – find out as much as you can about what the charity you are applying for is currently doing, and share that knowledge in your interview. And finally, don’t forget about the importance of transferable skills. Think about what the role is asking for, and how you have used your skills in similar situations and big that up in your application and interview.

What is the best bit about your job? –

Definitely the people I get to talk with every day. I support everyone from students to families to school children to retired people in their fundraising and I get to meet such a diverse range of people with so many different reasons for supporting and so many wild, wacky and wonderful ideas to fundraise – it’s so inspiring!

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

We have over 160 volunteers on our books, with over half coming from the student body. Our website has all the information around volunteering as well as the shifts we offer and times we offer them. There is plenty of scope for innovation in our volunteering opportunities and we welcome any ideas as to how we can improve the volunteering experiences we offer

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

I am an ex-homeless individual that used the services offered by Jimmy’s in 2010. I then volunteered for a while and then was offered the role of training manager before progressing to my current post.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

I feel there has to be a passion for the cause. And a resilience that not everything that is tried to undertake the charity’s mission will not always come to fruition

What is the best bit about your job? –

Actually seeing the change in individuals, from street life to front door is such a rewarding feeling.

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

We have loads of different ways that students can get involved with our charity. We are always looking for volunteers who are willing to help us sign people up to the register, fundraise for us or raise awareness of stem cell donations. We have many student groups of Anthony Nolan at universities around the country, including a great group at your university called Cambridge Marrow. They tirelessly hold events to sign people up to the stem cell register and raise vital funds. They are always looking for more volunteers to help them out at these events and will be more than happy to train people so that they can sign others up to the register. You can find them on Facebook as Cambridge Marrow. We also have a great Marrow Alumni team consisting of committee members that organise social events for like minded people to get together, along with offering employability help too. We also run a scheme called R&Be, where we go into schools and talk about blood, organ and stem cell donations. We sign up people aged 16-30 on to our register, so sixth form students can make the informed decision to join the register. If you love a bit of public speaking, we love to train up new volunteer speakers. (this also looks amazing on your CV) For more information about how you can volunteer at any of our events please contact us at community@anthonynolan.org or give us a call on 0303 303 3002.

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

I was part of the Anthony Nolan student group, Kent Marrow whilst I was at University. In my third year I was on the committee as the President which gave me a wealth of experience working in aid of a charity, as well as working in team of people with a variety of roles that included fundraising, volunteer management and publicity. Other people that I work with got into the charity sector by having voluntary work at charities, internships and general hospitality experience where you are working with people. Anthony Nolan offers a range of paid internships for people who are interested in working in the charity sector and want to gain more experience in specific areas.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

There are many different jobs within the charity sector, so it’s important to have experience that is relevant to the role. We also look for a passion for the particular cause, and for the sector in general, where you understand the reasoning of people that want to support charities. Great skills at building relationships with a wide variety of people is important, whether this is fundraisers, supporters volunteers, suppliers or internal colleagues.

What is the best bit about your job? –

Working with fantastic supporters, like our marrow groups, every day and hearing their amazing stories of why they want to support the charity. It’s inspirational to see how much some of our supporters can raise, and when you find out that another person has been saved through a stem cell transplant, it makes it all worthwhile.

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

Blue Smile greatly appreciates local support in both profile raising and fundraising in aid of our work. We also welcome sharing of skills that help us deliver and develop our service.

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

I was previously the Chief Executive at Alzheimer’s Research UK, and for 17 years helped to tackle this enormous problem. I was then really shocked by how little money was spent on children’s mental health and what an even bigger problem it is. Yet therapy can totally change things for an emotionally troubled child.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

The charity sector is brilliant for allowing you to make a real difference. At Blue Smile, we offer the opportunity to dedicate your time, energy and imagination to local children who really need it.

What is the best bit about your job? –

Making a huge difference in troubled children’s lives so that they can enjoy their childhood and improve their prospects.

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

We’d be hugely appreciative of any support Cambridge students can offer for our fundraising and awareness-raising work. We’d be delighted to provide charity collecting buckets and stickers for anyone prepared to help us out with collections. For more in-depth experience of fundraising and communications in the charity sector, we offer a voluntary position in our London office during the summer break. Whilst it’s an unpaid position, we provide travel and lunch expenses, the opportunity to be part of our closely knit team, and as much career advice as we can offer.

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

I left Cambridge with a Classics degree. Startled by the prospect of returning home, I threw my lot into the milk round and headed for London. Five years in one of the big accountancy firms gave me a grounding in finance and the urge to do something more constructive than advise multinational companies how to pay less tax. The move to the charity sector wasn’t straightforward and – like many – I worked my way into a paid role with a couple of stints of voluntary experience at development organisations. But since being in, I haven’t looked back.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

Recognise that the non-profit sector has its own specialisms and needs specific skills. Build a knowledge of these, and develop your own expertise by volunteering. Then hang in there – most charities operate on a tight budget and positions are rarely sitting vacant, but if you’re good, your chance will come.

What is the best bit about your job? –

Without a doubt, my colleagues. It’s fantastic to work with a team of people deeply committed to the same cause. Nobody’s here for the money; we’re part of Child Soldiers International because we believe that we can bring about change – an end to the use of child soldiers.

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

Volunteers can really help us. We suggest anyone interested in volunteering to help AMF should contact us and we can discuss specific activities and projects we are focusing on at the time.

How did you start working for the charity or enter the charity sector? –

Some years ago, I saw a television programme about a 2-year-old girl who suffered 90% burns in a house fire. I was very moved by her story and wanted to do something to help. Two friends agreed to swim with me the equivalent of the English Channel in a swimming pool (I’m not brave enough or fit enough to do the real thing!) and, rather surprisingly, three people swimming became 10,000 people swimming in 153 swims in 75 countries – all to raise money for a little girl called Terri who lived 40 miles north of London in Ipswich. We ended up raising a lot of money for Terri. One thing led to another and I decided it would be a good idea to try and get a million people to swim (go figure!), broadly on the same day, all round the world to help in the fight against malaria and AMF started. At that time, 2+ million died from malaria every year, the majority children under 5. That was the equivalent of seven jumbo jets full of children under 5 dying from malaria every day and it was the biggest killer of pregnant women in the world, bar none. Many organisations – and donors – have contributed to those numbers coming down to 0.5 to 1m deaths a year so we are definitely making progress. But as the equivalent of four 747s of children under 5 still die from malaria each day, here we are 12 years on and there is more we need to do. More here.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

Passion. Then depending on when you enter the charity sector, strong experience in one or more areas so you can get things done.

What is the best bit about your job? –

We improve people’s lives, often in a fundamental way

How can local students volunteer with your charity? –

We have a number of opportunities for volunteering at Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre: Helpline and email support volunteers CRCC volunteers provide confidential emotional support via email and/or telephone to survivors of rape and sexual abuse. We support anyone who identifies as a woman, regardless of age and background. All our volunteers are women who have undertaken a comprehensive selection and training process. Who we are looking for Women who are:
• Empathetic, non-judgemental and good listeners
• Able to commit to volunteering for at least 18 months and a minimum of three shifts a month
• Able to maintain confidentiality and anonymity
• Open to discussing and learning about rape and sexual violence, and its impacts on women and girls

How to get in touch
If this sounds like you, or you would like to know more, email volunteering@cambridgerapecrisis.org.uk and we will send you an information pack when we are next recruiting. We especially welcome applications from BME women, disabled women and LBT (lesbian, bisexual and trans*) women. We can contribute to childcare costs and reasonable travel expenses to enable women to volunteer on the helpline/email service. Helpline and email support training takes place twice a year, usually in the spring and autumn.

Fundraising volunteers –

We have an active and enthusiastic group of women who organise our fundraising events and come up with new ways of raising money for CRCC. This is an essential part of CRCC as the funds raised help keep our services running, as well as allowing us to develop new services to support survivors of sexual violence. The volunteers also help to raise awareness of CRCC’s services within the local community. Our fundraising events range from stalls at community events, such as the Pink Festival or Mill Road Winter Fair, as well as larger events, such as zumbathons, ceilidhs and fire walks. We also have people who raise money for us individually, by running marathons, organising their own events, baking cakes for our stalls, or even donating goods for raffle prizes. Women can be as involved as they choose! If you are interested in helping to organise an event – or many events – with or for CRCC, we would love to hear from you! Whether it’s helping gather raffle prizes, baking cakes, sourcing venues, talking to members of the public about CRCC or looking for opportunities to help raise our profile, you can do as much or as little as you have time for. Our fundraising group usually meets on the 4th Tuesday of each month, from 6-7:30pm.
Email us at volunteering@cambridgerapecrisis.org.uk if you would like more information about joining the group or if you have an idea for an event.

Trustees –

We have an active and committed group of women who are Trustees for Cambridge Rape Crisis. While we are not actively seeking additional Trustees, if you think you would like to join our board and have the passion for our cause, then please do get in touch. If you are wondering whether you are the ‘right kind of person’ to be a Trustee, let us reassure you that we have no rigid picture in mind. As with our volunteer body, we welcome women from all walks of life, with all levels and types of experience, provided that they have the time and commitment to make a contribution, and the skills to help them work as a team. Naturally, some positions require more formal experience and training, but in general what we look for is:
• Commitment to CRCC;
• Willingness and ability to devote the necessary time and effort;
• Strategic vision;
• Good, independent judgement;
• Ability to think creatively;
• Willingness to speak her mind;
• Understanding and acceptance of the legal duties, responsibilities and liabilities of trusteeship;
• Ability to work effectively as a member of a team; and
• Willingness to uphold Nolan’s seven principles of public life: selflessness, integrity, objectivity, accountability, openness, honesty and leadership.

How did you start working for the charity? –

I started work at Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre in 2010. Prior to this I had worked at the Cambridge Women’s Resource Centre, British Red Cross and as an Equalities Development Manager for the local authority. The vast majority of my working life (paid and voluntary) has been in the charitable sector and focussed on human rights, gender equality and ending violence against women and girls.

What do you think is important for candidates applying for jobs at your charity or in the charity sector? –

Just some examples of what we might look for in someone wanting to work with us:
• An understanding of the issues affecting women and children who have experienced sexual violence
• An understanding of the associated support needs of women and children who have experienced sexual violence
• A commitment to improving the lives of women and children who have experienced sexual violence
• Clear boundaries around confidential working practices
• Commitment to delivering a quality service
• Commitment to equal opportunities and anti-oppressive practice
• Motivation and drive to take projects forward and initiate new projects

What is the best bit about your job? –

The job I do is hugely rewarding and I feel very privileged to be part of Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre. I am so inspired by the strength, courage and resilience of the women and children we work with. Being part of someone’s journey to recover even in a small way can be life changing.